Anti-Piracy Plans

RANT/COMMENTARY
OR DON’T THE ISP PROVIDERS HAVE ANYTHING BETTER TO DO?

We have all been afraid of what’s to come in our now corporate run society, but the worst news for us is just emerging. I suppose it was only a matter of time before we would face an even more difficult obstacle where uploading and downloading are concerned. We discovered that some of the ISP providers will be forthcoming with our personal information and will be policing us-their users.

You might have time to switch your providers before this goes into effect. On November 28th AT&T, and many others will launch their systems, warning copyright infringement abusers that you will be directed to a copyright page for educational purposes and the sites blocked from your use. AT&T starts Six Strikes Anti-Piracy Plan. Repeat offenders will have no choice but to be re-educated, and will block all sites that it deems you use on a regular basis. I wonder if this means brain-washing by boredom.*snore* Can they really manage to force me into reading something I don’t want to? They can block my ass six ways from Sunday but they can’t force me to read anything!

Pirate Bay’s new infrastructure. Here are some other bits of torrent news and updates for you concerning anti-piracy gangs. There are other sites that are thinking the way of the cloud is the way to go, however, they say the downloader is then responsible for the jail time and fines if they continue to download under the threat from the Feds. How nice!

A new precedent was set at the Court of the Hague where Hollywood backed anti-piracy group called Brien won a landmark case against a provider, XS Networks for damages that copyright holders suffered because of torrent sites. Namely Sumo Torrent, the network refused to hand over personal info of the owners of Sumo as well as non-compliance in shutting the torrent site down. Obviously the U.S. and the big name Hollywood groups have already brought pressure to bare on our ISP providers and no one is even challenging it here in a court of law. Torrent sites web-hosts have been ordered to pay damages. Talk about your roll over with legs in the air! Damn Beta dogs!

I have a feeling if the torrent sites cannot find a way around this problem the complete end of torrent sites will be near. If this does happen and there will be no e-books available for free any more then I will have to go back to paper based books. I refuse to pay for books that I do not own. Don’t ask me where I will put all of those books, but I’m stubborn so I will figure out a way, maybe box them if I have to. (Saves on dusting)

DMCA notice forces 1,450,000 education blogs offline. Really??? Is there a place on the planet we can move to where I don’t have a fusion center spying on me? Probably not. I see a future here in the U.S. where the government owns and runs our internet and everyone will be forced to use it, and only the sites they want you to have access to. (Don’t laugh) The auto-mated DMCA take-down notices are now running amok and will soon issue a take-down for me personally! (Feeling around under the bed for the full automatic).

Gen runs up against take-down notices on a weekly basis. So when she puts something up I suggest you grab it while the getting is good.

So in closing on my info-commentary-fueled-rant and where I feel sure our Dystopian future is headed, I wanted you to discover what I had discovered and to be more aware of where our favorite pastime is headed.

7 thoughts on “Anti-Piracy Plans

  1. This isn't really a matter of stealing media (books, movies, music…) online. This is more of a matter of an infringement on our personal rights as Americans. I say Americans because this issue isn't nearly as widespread throughout the rest of the world.

    We do have widespread piracy in the US and I'll touch more on that in a second. This comes more into play with the new 6 strike agreement between the major ISPs.

    It's no secret that the RIAA has made a a name for itself by going after anyone whom it can find. They serve tons of people suites that measure into tens of thousands of dollars no one can afford. They got some bad press. I'm sure by now we've all heard the stories of them sueing minors and taking that poor girls Whinny the Pooh laptop.

    Obviously they were generating more bad press than what they were going against their efforts. So they started going after the ISPs. Rightfully, a lot of ISPs refused to hand over personal information without court order. Even with court orders, some refused. They did this for good reason. There are so many implications behind utility companies just handing over personal information to anyone who asks it's not funny. But that is beyond the scope of this comment.

    Many lawsuits and years later, the problem is still not solved and has only become more fuzzy. A lot of research has been done by major ISPs to try and figure out how to come to a middle ground.

    As a result the 6 major ISPs came up with the six strike agreement. They found that a lot of people didn't really understand the scope of piracy. Essentially the 6 strike agreements don't intend to put violators in financial ruin, but instead try and educate them of the entire scope of piracy.

    In short, they really aren't out to sue anyone. They go through measures like throttling bandwidth, reverting, temporarily shutting off service, reverting people to websites about piracy, etc..

    This is their new attempt. In reality the sixth strike doesn't mean to much. Leaked documents from Verizon prove as much. Comcast and Time Warner are already on a slippery slope with bad press (hence the whole “new” Xfinity rebranding a few years back).

  2. What's the down side to this? It's another shotgun effect that won't harm people as badly as the random suits from the RIAA misguided bloodhounds. They are trying a new strategy.

    But this is only for consumers, not torrent sites and host companies and such.

    The implications of this deserves an entire blog of itself. I would do some searching because there are a bunch already.

    Engadget has a good, quick article on the implications. Take it a bit further and look up wardriving. Look how easy that is. How many people do you know that will randomly attach to some persons open WiFi network to get some quick information? What about your local Starbucks or McDonalds? What if your neighbor cracked your WiFi password and used it? Are these people to blame for the fines and throttled connections or the constant redirects to another anti-piracy site?

    Before anyone says that the businesses should handle this, do you want them looking at everything your looking at on the internet? Should they be privy to personal files and information or business files used at their hot spots? Also, people attaching on to private WiFi networks is a lot more common than what people think. It's just no one talks about it.

    What about all those sites hosting files? DO you have any idea how difficult it is to look for all these files that are illegal? What are you going to do, search for file names? They can be changed. Compare MD5 checksums on every file? It can be altered. Check for byte patterns in the file? A simple setup file with a random obsufication code can be made to change it.

    Should torrents be illegal? What about all those open domain pieces? Torrents are far cheaper for a non-profit business than hosting servers. Where would I get my copy of linux then? Just about every distro hosts through torrents. There are plenty of legal uses for torrents.

    I'm sorry to go on a rant, but it might make the implications of this article much more clear.

  3. What's the down side to this? It's another shotgun effect that won't harm people as badly as the random suits from the RIAA misguided bloodhounds. They are trying a new strategy.

    But this is only for consumers, not torrent sites and host companies and such.

    The implications of this deserves an entire blog of itself. I would do some searching because there are a bunch already.

    Engadget has a good, quick article on the implications. Take it a bit further and look up wardriving. Look how easy that is. How many people do you know that will randomly attach to some persons open WiFi network to get some quick information? What about your local Starbucks or McDonalds? What if your neighbor cracked your WiFi password and used it? Are these people to blame for the fines and throttled connections or the constant redirects to another anti-piracy site?

    Before anyone says that the businesses should handle this, do you want them looking at everything your looking at on the internet? Should they be privy to personal files and information or business files used at their hot spots? Also, people attaching on to private WiFi networks is a lot more common than what people think. It's just no one talks about it.

    What about all those sites hosting files? DO you have any idea how difficult it is to look for all these files that are illegal? What are you going to do, search for file names? They can be changed. Compare MD5 checksums on every file? It can be altered. Check for byte patterns in the file? A simple setup file with a random obsufication code can be made to change it.

    Should torrents be illegal? What about all those open domain pieces? Torrents are far cheaper for a non-profit business than hosting servers. Where would I get my copy of linux then? Just about every distro hosts through torrents. There are plenty of legal uses for torrents.

    I'm sorry to go on a rant, but it might make the implications of this article much more clear.

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